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Hanes Hall

August 2016

GRAD STUDENT ORIENTATION

August 22, 2016 @ 9:30 am - 1:00 pm

The department will hold an orientation for all incoming MS and PhD students on Monday, August 22, 2016 from 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM Meet us in the lounge area of Hanes Hall, 3rd floor.

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September 2016

STOR Colloquium: Alfredo Garcia, ARO and University of Florida

September 12, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Alfredo Garcia, Army Research Office (ARO) and University of Florida   Iterative Mechanisms for Electricity Markets   Abstract: We consider the problem of designing the rules by which dispatch and payment to electricity market participants are gradually adjusted while taking into account network and reliability constraints so as to ensure the market clears with an efficient outcome. Small adjustments (which require minimal information from market participants at each iteration) facilitate the identification of incentives for ensuring truthful reporting of private…

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STOR Colloquium: Bin Hu, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

September 19, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Bin Hu University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School Is Reshoring Better than Offshoring? The Effect of Offshore Supply Dependence In this paper we investigate the effect of offshore supply dependence (OSD) on offshoring-reshoring profit comparisons. We find that OSD hampers a reshoring manufacturer's responsiveness to demand information updates and may significantly affect offshoring-reshoring comparisons, such that reshoring may yield lower profits than offshoring in many cases, including when offshoring has no baseline-cost advantage. We then show…

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STOR Graduate Seminar: Steven Wolf and Gina-Marie Pomann

September 21, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Seminar Wednesday, September 21st, 2016 120 Hanes Hall 3:30pm Steven Wolf and Gina-Maria Pomann Duke's Biostatistics Core Collaborating in Clinical Research with Duke’s Biostatistics Core The Biostatistics Core at Duke aims to work with an interdisciplinary network of clinical investigators conducting research at Duke by providing expertise in study design, implementation of statistical methodology, and interpretation of results. We actively participate on all aspects of statistical design and analysis, protocol development/grant applications with statistical considerations such as power/sample calculations,…

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October 2016

STOR colloquium: Nelson Antunes, CEMAT/University of Lisbon

October 3, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Nelson Antunes CEMAT/University of Lisbon and University of Algarve Sampling Internet traffic: estimation of flow distributions In this talk, the focus is on recovering the flow (sequence of packets sharing common attributes) size and duration distributions from sampled Internet traffic using a number of previously introduced packet sampling algorithms. Assuming a basic probabilistic flow model, the distribution of flow durations is expressed in terms of the distributions of flow sizes and flow IATs (interarrival times between packets). The available estimation…

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Graduate Student Seminar: Danianne Mizzy

October 5, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Danianne Mizzy from the Science Library will speak and answer questions about resources and services available to all graduate students.   Location:  Hanes Hall 125

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STOR colloquium: Joe Guinness, North Carolina State University

October 10, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Joe Guinness North Carolina State University Permutation methods for sharpening Gaussian process approximations   Vecchia's approximate likelihood for Gaussian process parameters depends on how the observations are ordered, which can be viewed as a deficiency because the exact likelihood is permutation-invariant. I take the alternative standpoint that the ordering of the observations is an aspect that can be tuned to sharpen the approximations. I show that advantageously chosen orderings of the observations can drastically improve the approximations. In addition to…

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STOR colloquium: Dirk Lorenz, Braunschweig Technical University

October 17, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Dirk Lorenz Braunschweig Technical University Probabilistic Image Models and Extensions of the Perona-Malik Filter The Perona-Malik model has been very successful at restoring images from noisy input.  In this paper, we show how the Perona-Malik model can be reinterpreted and extended using the language of Gaussian scale mixtures.  Specifically, we show how the expectation-maximization EM algorithm applied to Gaussian scale mixtures leads to the lagged-diffusivity algorithm for computing stationary points of the Perona-Malik diffusion equations.  Moreover, we show how mean…

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Graduate Seminar – Kai Zhang

October 26, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Kai Zhang Statistics and Operations Research UNC-Chapel Hill BET on Independence We study the problem of model-free dependence detection. This problem can be difficult even when the marginal distributions are known. We explain this difficulty by showing the impossibility to uniformly consistently distinguish degeneracy from independence with any single test. To make model-free dependence detection a tractable problem, we introduce the concept of binary expansion statistics (BEStat) and propose the binary expansion testing (BET) framework. Through simple mathematics, we convert…

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STOR colloquium: Seyed Emadi, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

October 31, 2016 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Impact of Delay Announcements in Call Centers: An Empirical Approach   We undertake an empirical study of the impact of delay announcements on callers' abandonment behavior and the performance of a call center with two priority classes. A Cox regression analysis reveals that in this call center, callers' abandonment behavior is affected by the announcement messages heard. To account for this, we formulate a structural estimation model of callers' (endogenous) abandonment decisions. In this model, callers are forward-looking utility maximizers…

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November 2016

Probability Seminar: Jay Newby, UNC-CH

November 3, 2016 @ 3:30 am - 4:30 pm

Probability Seminar Thursday, November 3, 2016 Hanes 125 4:15 PM Jay Newby University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill   An artificial neural network approach to automated particle tracking analysis of 2D and 3D microscopy videos Tracking of microscopic species is one of the most utilized experimental technologies in materials science, biophysics, tissue engineering and nanomedicine.  The goal is to draw inferences (e.g., viscous and elastic moduli, mesh spacings, passage times) by statistical analysis of particle traces.  This in turn allows for…

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STOR colloquium: Ivo Adan, Eindhoven University of Technology

November 7, 2016 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Ivo Adan Technical University of Eindhoven and EURANDOM The Netherlands   A rate balance principle   We introduce a rate balance principle for general (not necessarily Markovian) stochastic processes, with special attention to birth-death like processes. This principle appears to be useful in deriving well-known, as well as new results for various queueing systems.           Refreshments will be served at 3:00pm in the 3rd floor lounge of Hanes Hall

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STOR colloquium: CANCELLED

November 14, 2016 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

This colloquium has been cancelled.  We apologize for any inconvenience. STOR colloquium: Vanja Dukic, University of Colorado-Boulder

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STOR colloquium: Stephen Becker, University of Colorado-Boulder

November 21, 2016 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Stephen Becker University of Colorado Boulder Efficient robust PCA algorithms for the GPU   We introduce the matrix completion problem and the similar robust PCA (RPCA) problem and discuss their relation to compressed sensing and some of their applications to collaborative filtering, background detection in videos, and neuroscience. We cover some standard algorithms to solve these problems, including proximal gradient descent, Frank-Wolfe/conditional-gradient, and Burer-Monteiro splitting. A natural idea to speed up the algorithms is to run them on the GPU…

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December 2016

Probability Seminar: Dieter Mitsche, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis

December 1, 2016 @ 3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

 “On the spectral gap of random hyperbolic graphs”   Random hyperbolic graphs have been suggested as a promising model of social networks. A few of their fundamental parameters have been studied. However, none of them concerns their spectra. We consider the random hyperbolic graph model as formalized by Gugelmann et al. and essentially determine the spectral gap of their normalized Laplacian. Specifically, we establish that with high probability the second smallest eigenvalue of the normalized Laplacian of the giant component…

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STOR colloquium: Elaine McVey, TransLoc/Insightus

December 5, 2016 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Title: Commuting, voting, and the off-label use of data   Abstract: The modern practice of data science often involves approaching datasets differently than in traditional statistics.  Two analyses will be presented, both of which use combinations of public datasets in expected and "off-label" ways.  One addresses the need to simulate realistic commuting patterns, and the other evaluates the effects of North Carolina voting site decisions.  In the process of telling the stories of these two data science projects, we'll have…

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January 2017

Probability Seminar: Michael Perlmutter, UNC-CH

January 19, 2017 @ 3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Michael Perlmutter UNC-Chapel Hill Department of Statistics and Operations Research   Martingale Transforms and their Applications to Harmonic Analysis Martingale transform methods are a powerful tool for the study of many operators of classical interest in harmonic analysis such as the Riesz transforms and the Beurling-Ahlfors transform. In particular, these methods allow us to transfer D.L. Burkholder’s sharp constant, p*-1, for the boundedness of martingale transforms to a large class of analytic operators. I will discuss the history of such…

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Grad Student Seminar

January 20, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Siyun Yu Server Allocation at Virtual Computing Labs via Queueing Models and Statistical Forecasting The Virtual Computing Lab (VCL) is a cloud computing service that provides users remote access to software applications. The main challenge is to decide how many servers should be preloaded with which applications, and how many servers should be left flexible, to be loaded with the requested application on demand. If a preloaded server with a desired application is available, the user gets immediate access. If…

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STOR Colloquium: Santiago Balseiro, Duke University

January 30, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Santiago Balseiro Duke University Dynamic Mechanisms with Martingale Utilities We study the dynamic mechanism design problem of a seller who repeatedly sells independent items to a buyer with private values. In this setting, the seller could potentially extract the entire buyer surplus by running efficient auctions and charging an upfront participation fee at the beginning of the horizon. In some markets, such as internet advertising, participation fees are not practical since buyers expect to inspect items before purchasing them. This…

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February 2017

STOR Colloquium: Julie Ivy, North Carolina State University

February 6, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Julie Ivy North Carolina State University To be Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Using Decision Modeling to Personalize Policy in Health, Hunger Relief, and Education   Decision making to satisfy the basic human needs of health, food, and education is complex, accomplishing this in such a way that solutions are personalized to the needs of the individual has been the focus of my research. This talk will present an overview of my research in the area of decision making under conditions…

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STOR Colloquium: Peter Hoff, Duke University

February 13, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Peter Hoff Duke University Adaptive FAB confidence intervals with constant coverage   Abstract: Confidence intervals for the means of multiple normal populations are often based on a hierarchical normal model. While commonly used interval procedures based on such a model have the nominal coverage rate on average across a population of groups, their actual coverage rate for a given group will be above or below the nominal rate, depending on the value of the group mean.   In this talk…

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Graduate seminar: Walt DeGrange, CANA Advisors

February 17, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Walt DeGrange is a Principal Operations Research Analyst for CANA Advisors where he leads operations research analysis across federal and commercial domains. He is also a faculty member at the University of Arkansas in the Operations Management graduate program, a MBA Executive  Practicum Advisor at the NC State University Supply Chain Resource Cooperative, a MORS Board of Director and the Chairperson for the INFORMS SpORts Section. His analytics projects include work with the Navy, Marine Corps, St Louis Blues (NHL),…

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STOR Colloquium: Gudrun Johnsen, University of Iceland

February 20, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Gudrun Johnsen University of Iceland   Title: If you look close enough you can see a whole lot: Data collection and analysis of the Parliamentary Investigation Commission looking into the Icelandic Banking Collapse in 2008   Abstract: The combined collapse of Iceland's three largest banks is the third largest bankruptcy in history and the largest banking system collapse suffered by any country in modern economic history, relative to GDP. In 2008 the Icelandic Parliament installed a Special Investigation Commission (SIC)…

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March 2017

STOR Colloquium: Mariana Olvera-Cravioto, University of California-Berkeley

March 1, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Directed complex networks and ranking algorithms In the first part of this talk I will discuss a family of inhomogeneous directed random graphs for modeling complex networks such as the web graph, Twitter, ResearchGate, and other social networks. This class of graphs includes as a special case the classical Erdos-Renyi model, and can be used to replicate almost any type of predetermined degree distributions, in particular, power-law degrees such as those observed in most real-world networks. I will mention during…

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STOR Colloquium: Zhiyi Zhang, UNC Charlotte

March 6, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Zhiyi Zhang University of North Carolina at Charlotte Title: Statistical Implications of Turing’s Formula   Abstract: This talk is organized into three parts.   Turing’s formula is introduced. Given an iid sample from a countable alphabet under a probability distribution, Turing’s formula (introduced by Good (1953), hence also known as the Good-Turing formula) is a mind-bending non-parametric estimator of total probability associated with letters of the alphabet that are NOT represented in the sample. Many of its statistical properties were…

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Hotelling Lectures: Aad van der Vaart, Leiden University

March 27, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Nonparametric Bayesian methods: frequentist analysis Aad van der Vaart Leiden University We present an overview of Bayesian methods to estimate functions or high-dimensional parameter vectors, and discuss the validity (or not) of these methods from a non-Bayesian point of view. For instance, we consider using a Gaussian process as a prior for a regression function or (after exponentiation and normalisation) for a density function. We characterise the rate at which the corresponding posterior distribution can recover a true function as…

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Hotelling Lectures: Aad van der Vaart, Leiden University

March 29, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Nonparametric Bayesian methods: frequentist analysis Aad van der Vaart Leiden University A more detailed view of Bayesian methods to estimate functions or high-dimensional parameter vectors, and discuss the validity (or not) of these methods from a non-Bayesian point of view. For instance, we consider using a Gaussian process as a prior for a regression function or (after exponentiation and normalisation) for a density function. We characterise the rate at which the corresponding posterior distribution can recover a true function as…

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April 2017

STOR Colloquium: Hongtu Zhu, MD Anderson

April 3, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Hongtu Zhu University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center   Title: Statistical Challenges, Opportunities, and Strategies in Large-Scale Medical Studies With the rapid growth of modern technology, many biomedical studies have collected data across different sources (e.g., imaging, genetics, and clinical) in an unprecedented scale. The integration of such ultra high-dimensional data raises many statistical challenges, rendering most existing statistical methods and old data platform no longer suitable and thus underscoring…

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Grad Student Seminar: Bryan Davis, Indeed.com

April 7, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Bryan Gilbert Davis Indeed.com   SEM Portfolio Optimization This talk will introduce the basic format and mechanisms of Search Engine Marketing and introduce the business motivations for its utilization. It will then delve into ongoing work at Indeed aimed at optimizing the distribution of budget over different queries, and will highlight the different modeling and engineering components of this work.

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CANCELLED STOR Colloquium

April 10, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Philip Ernst Rice University   Title: Yule's "Nonsense Correlation" Solved!   Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss how I recently resolved a longstanding open statistical problem. The problem, formulated by the British statistician Udny Yule in 1926, is to mathematically prove Yule's 1926 empirical finding of ``nonsense correlation.”  We solve the problem by analytically determining the second moment of the empirical correlation coefficient of two independent Wiener processes. Using tools from Fredholm integral equation theory, we calculate the second…

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STOR Colloquium: Ilse Ipsen, North Carolina State University

April 17, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Ilse Ipsen North Carolina State University Randomized Algorithms for Matrix Computations   The emergence of massive data sets, over the past fifteen or so years, has led to the development of Randomized Numerical Linear Algebra. Fast and accurate randomized matrix algorithms are being designed for applications like machine learning, population genomics, astronomy, nuclear engineering, and optimal experimental design. We give a flavour of randomized algorithms for the solution of least squares/regression problems and, if time permits, for the computation of…

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May 2017

GRADUATION CEREMONY

May 14, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Following the University's Commencement ceremony on May 14th, the Department of Statistics and Operations Research will have a brief ceremony to recognize the graduates from our B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. programs. This ceremony will take place at 1:00 PM in the Genome Science Building, room G100 and will be followed by an informal reception.

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August 2017

STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 7, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 9, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 10, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 11, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 14, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 15, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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STOR/BIOS Boot Camp

August 18, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Boot camp for incoming graduate students of the Statistics & Operations Research, and Biostatistics departments. 10am-12pm Linear Algebra 1pm-3pm Analysis All sessions meet in Hanes 130

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First Day of Classes

August 22, 2017 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Classes begin for the Fall 2017 semester

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November 2017

STOR Colloquium: Danica Ommen, Iowa State University

November 13, 2017 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Title: Different Paradigms of Interpretation for Forensic Value of Evidence Quantification Abstract: Currently, one of the major problems in the forensic science community is the confusion between different statistical paradigms. A quantification of the value of evidence is interpreted differently under each paradigm, and may even be the answer to different questions. It is our opinion that these issues need to be addressed before quantitative forensic analyses are considered a reliable science in the justice system. A related issue is the…

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April 2018

Ph.D. Defense: Dylan Glotzer

April 3, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Public Presentation* Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018 324 Hanes Hall 1:00 PM Dylan Glotzer   Extreme value analysis, nonlinear random oscillators, and applications to ship motions in irregular seas (under direction of Vladas Pipiras)   This talk will focus on primarily statistical approaches to the analysis of two extreme (rare) events of interest in Naval Architecture: a ship motion (e.g. roll) exceeding a large target angle, and the capsizing of a ship, both measured by relevant "metrics." The…

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Ph.D. Defense: Eric Friedlander

April 4, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Public Presentation Wednesday, April 4th, 2018 Gardner 210 1:00 PM Eric Friedlander Mean-Field Methods in Large Stochastic Networks (Under the direction of Amarjit Budhiraja)   Analysis of large-scale communication networks (e.g. ad hoc wireless networks, cloud computing systems, server networks etc.) is of great practical interest. The massive size of such networks frequently makes direct analysis intractable. Asymptotic approximations using fluid and diffusion scaling limits provide useful methods for approaching such problems. In this talk, we study…

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Ph.D. Defense: Yifan Cui

April 5, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Public Presentation Thursday, April 5th, 2018 103 New West 1:00 PM Yifan Cui Tree-based survival models and precision medicine (Under the direction of Dr. Michael R. Kosorok and Dr. Jan Hannig)   Random forests have become one of the most popular machine learning tools in recent years. The main advantage of tree- and forest-based models is their nonparametric nature. My dissertation mainly focuses on a particular type of tree and forest model, in which the outcomes are…

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Hotelling Lectures: Steven N. Evans, University of California – Berkeley

April 9, 2018 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Steven N. Evans, Departments of Mathematics and Statistics, University of California at Berkeley Title: Some mathematical insights into aging and mortality   Abstract: In 1825 Benjamin Gompertz noted that, to a reasonable approximation, mortality rates after maturity in the British population increased exponentially with age. This unexpected yet simple relationship has since been seen in many multi-cellular organisms. Recently, it has been observed that this exponential increase appears to level off in extreme old age. I will discuss ongoing work…

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May 2018

Ph.D. Defense: Leo Liu

May 10, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Public Presentation Thursday, May 10th, 2018 125 Hanes Hall 10:00 AM Leo Yu-Feng Liu   Advanced Statistical Learning Techniques for High-Dimensional Imaging Data   With the rapid development of neuroimaging techniques, scientists are interested in identifying imaging biomarkers that are related to different subtypes or transitional stages of various cancers, neuropsychiatric diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. The scalar-on-image models have been proven to demonstrate good performance in such tasks. However, due to their high dimensionality, traditional methods may…

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February 2019

Graduate Admissions Visit Day

February 21, 2019 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
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One event on February 25, 2021 at 8:00 am

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Graduate Admissions Visit Day

February 22, 2019 @ 7:30 am - 4:30 pm
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March 2019

STOR Colloquium: Jonathan M. Lees, UNC-Chapel Hill

March 4, 2019 @ 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Jonathan M. Lees University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill   Geophysical Time Series Analysis on Volcanoes: Can we quantify non-linearity? Most geophysical processes are aperiodic noisy, intermittent and transient.  This requires specialized methods for time series analysis, that seek patterns in time series that vary in space and time.  I present here examples from research on exploding volcanoes that exhibit tremor that appears to be resonant but likely results from nonlinear feedback systems.  The physical models for these observations…

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October 2019

Statistics Seminar: Wen Zhou, Colorado State University

October 7, 2019 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Estimation and Inference of a Heteroskedasticity Model with Latent Semiparametric Factors for Panel Data Analysis   We consider estimation and inference of a flexible subject-specific heteroskedasticity model for analyzing large scale panel data, which employs latent semiparametric factor structure to simultaneously account for the heteroskedasticity across subjects and contemporaneous correlations. Specifically, the heteroskedasticity across subjects is modeled by the product of unobserved stationary process of factors and subject-specific covariate effect. Serving as the loading, the covariate effect is further modeled…

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March 2020

Ph.D. Defense: Weiwei Li

March 19, 2020 @ 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Public Presentation Thursday, March 19th, 2020 12:30 PM Location: Virtual www.zoom.us/join Meeting ID: 604 122 248 Password: 244139 Weiwei Li    Data Science Methods with Applications to Genetic Sequencing   Data science methods is of increasing importance in modern genetic sequencing analysis. In this dissertation, we mainly focus on applying statistical modeling to structural variant detection problem and a new frame work for scalable and provable subspace clustering. In the first project, we discuss the optimal sampling strategy…

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Ph.D. Defense: Duyeol Lee

March 26, 2020 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Duyeol Lee  Public Presentation via ZOOM Join URL: https://unc.zoom.us/j/955324595 Precision Finance and BERET  Ongoing advances in financial theory, from modern portfolio theory to valuation of complex financial derivatives, have heavily relied on statistical methodologies. In particular, portfolio theory has become a basic model that must be considered by a variety of market participants, from large financial institutions to individual investors. Another important statistical topic in financial modeling is measuring the dependency among various risk factors and testing independence among them.…

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April 2020

STAN Undergraduate Advising Webinar

April 1, 2020 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

For all STAN majors and minors:  Before registration opens on April 6, we would like to welcome you to an online webinar to address all of your registration questions. All of you are encouraged to attend. The more students who join this webinar, the more valuable this event will be for everyone, as we find many students have overlapping questions. This event will be held on April 1 at 6PM and can be accessed using the Zoom link below: Join…

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August 2020

CWE Exams

August 3, 2020 @ 8:30 am - 1:30 pm
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An event every day that begins at 8:30 am, repeating until August 7, 2020

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CWE Exams

August 4, 2020 @ 8:30 am - 1:30 pm
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An event every day that begins at 8:30 am, repeating until August 7, 2020

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CWE Exams

August 5, 2020 @ 8:30 am - 1:30 pm
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An event every day that begins at 8:30 am, repeating until August 7, 2020

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CWE Exams

August 6, 2020 @ 8:30 am - 1:30 pm
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An event every day that begins at 8:30 am, repeating until August 7, 2020

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CWE Exams

August 7, 2020 @ 8:30 am - 1:30 pm
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An event every day that begins at 8:30 am, repeating until August 7, 2020

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September 2020

STOR Colloquium: Themis Sapsis, MIT

September 21, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Output-Weighted Active Sampling for Bayesian Uncertainty Quantification and Prediction of Rare Events Themis Sapsis We introduce a class of acquisition functions for sample selection that leads to faster convergence in applications related to Bayesian uncertainty quantification of rare events. The approach follows the paradigm of active learning, whereby existing samples of a black-box function are utilized to optimize the next most informative sample. The proposed method aims to take advantage of the fact that some input directions of the black-box function…

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October 2020

STOR Colloquium: Patrick Combettes, NCSU

October 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Patrick Louis Combettes North Carolina State University Perspective Functions and Applications In this talk I will discuss mathematical and computational issues pertaining to perspective functions, a powerful concept that permits to extend a convex function to a jointly convex one in terms of an additional scale variable. Applications in inverse problems and statistics will be presented.

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STOR Colloquium: Lihua Lei, Stanford

October 19, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Lihua Lei Stanford University Hierarchical Community Detection for Heterogeneous and Multi-scaled Networks   Real-world networks are often hierarchical, heterogeneous, and multi-scaled, while the idealized stochastic block models that are extensively studied in the literature tend to be over-simplified. In a line of work, we propose several top-down recursive partitioning algorithms which start with the entire network and divide the nodes into two communities by certain spectral clustering methods repeatedly, until a stopping rule indicates no further community structures. For these…

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November 2020

STOR Colloquium: Jacob Bien, USC

November 2, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Jacob Bien University of Southern California Tree-Based Aggregation of Rare Features for Prediction   It is common in modern prediction problems for many features to be counts of rarely occurring events.  The challenge posed by such "rare features" has received little attention despite its prevalence in diverse areas, ranging from biology (e.g., rare species within a microbiome) to natural language processing (e.g., rare words within an online hotel review). We show, both theoretically and empirically, that not explicitly accounting for…

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STOR Colloquium: Mayya Zhilova, Georgia Tech

November 9, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Mayya Zhilova Georgia Institute of Technology Nonasymptotic Edgeworth-type expansions for growing dimension.   In this talk I would like to discuss the problem of establishing higher order accuracy of bootstrapping procedures and (non-)normal approximation in the multivariate or high-dimensional setting. This topic is important for numerous problems in statistical inference and applications concerned with confidence estimation and hypothesis testing, and involving a growing dimension of random data or unknown parameter. In particular, I will focus on higher-order expansions for the…

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STOR Colloquium: Kavita Ramanan, Brown University

November 16, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Kavita Ramanan Brown University Large Deviations of Random Projections of High-dimensional Measures   Properties of random projections of high-dimensional probability measures are of interest in a variety of fields, including asymptotic convex geometry, and high-dimensional statistics and data analysis. A particular question of interest is to identify what properties of the high-dimensional measure are captured by its lower-dimensional projections. While fluctuations of these projections have been well studied over the past decade, we describe more recent work on both annealed…

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January 2021

Friday Lunch

January 29 @ 12:05 pm - 1:00 pm
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An event every week that begins at 12:05 pm on Friday, repeating until May 7, 2021

Informal lunch for the Fall 2020 graduate student cohort.  Get to know each other better!  Guests will include various faculty and graduate students from previous cohorts.  Check your email for the Zoom link.

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February 2021

Friday Lunch

February 5 @ 12:05 pm - 1:00 pm
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An event every week that begins at 12:05 pm on Friday, repeating until May 7, 2021

Informal lunch for the Fall 2020 graduate student cohort.  Get to know each other better!  Guests will include various faculty and graduate students from previous cohorts.  Check your email for the Zoom link.

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Friday Lunch

February 12 @ 12:05 pm - 1:00 pm
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An event every week that begins at 12:05 pm on Friday, repeating until May 7, 2021

Informal lunch for the Fall 2020 graduate student cohort.  Get to know each other better!  Guests will include various faculty and graduate students from previous cohorts.  Check your email for the Zoom link.

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Friday Lunch

February 19 @ 12:05 pm - 1:00 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 12:05 pm on Friday, repeating until May 7, 2021

Informal lunch for the Fall 2020 graduate student cohort.  Get to know each other better!  Guests will include various faculty and graduate students from previous cohorts.  Check your email for the Zoom link.

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